July 5, 2019

American Dance Festival Performance Season

Location: DPAC, Durham Performing Arts Center and Duke Venues

Featuring 38 performances by 25 companies and choreographers in 5 different venues.

July 10, 2019

Art Exhibit – "Godchild"

Location: 21C Museum Hotel

Divinity and art in the Western world have worked together to create a set of toxic ideals, one in which Whiteness is the sole standard of beauty and the genesis of Christianity. Anything ‘other’ is unworthy of God’s love and feeling beautiful. In this photographic series artist Kennedi Carter attempts to rewrite this narrative by injecting Blackness into these historically White spaces, to create a story that represents Blackness as beautiful and queerness as holy.

July 11, 2019

Golden Expression: the First Annual Exhibition of Golden Belt Resident Artists

Location: The Grand Gallery in Mill No. 1 – Golden Belt

View selections from Golden Belt artists – and visit the studios where these works are created.

July 13, 2019

Art Exhibit - "Circa 1960"

Location: Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University


The period around 1960 was one of great artistic evolution in
the United States. The long-standing influence exerted by Abstract
Expressionism, a gestural type of painting and sculpture that emerged
after World War II, was dwindling. Artists coming of age at this time
perceived the style as mannered and academic and sought to distance
themselves from its pervasive legacy. This resulted in a gradual shift
in artistic approaches and philosophical attitudes. The works in this
installation demonstrate both the lingering hallmarks of Abstract
Expressionism and the precursors to these new artistic directions.

Frank Stella’s monumental Great Jones Street provides an
example of the changing attitudes of younger artists. Though Stella
retained some of the formal characteristics of Abstract Expressionism
(large format and painterly qualities), he dispensed with the older
generation’s desire to transmit an existential condition to the canvas.
Instead, he wanted simply to “get the paint out of the can and onto the
canvas” with as little inventiveness as possible. Philip Guston, central
to Abstract Expressionism’s development, made a subtle but significant
stylistic shift in Portrait I. At the center of the painting
floats a large dark form that points to his forthcoming adoption of a
cartoonish, figurative style. Al Held, Bruce Conner, Dorothy Dehner and
many others participated in this rich transitional period, ultimately
helping to move art in the United States in numerous directions.

Organized by Marshall N. Price, Ph.D., Nancy A. Nasher and David J. Haemisegger Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art.

Tu, W, F, Sa 10am-5pm, Th 10am-9pm (General admission is free from 5-9pm), Su Noon-5pm.

July 14, 2019

Art Exhibit - "Circa 1960"

Location: Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University


The period around 1960 was one of great artistic evolution in
the United States. The long-standing influence exerted by Abstract
Expressionism, a gestural type of painting and sculpture that emerged
after World War II, was dwindling. Artists coming of age at this time
perceived the style as mannered and academic and sought to distance
themselves from its pervasive legacy. This resulted in a gradual shift
in artistic approaches and philosophical attitudes. The works in this
installation demonstrate both the lingering hallmarks of Abstract
Expressionism and the precursors to these new artistic directions.

Frank Stella’s monumental Great Jones Street provides an
example of the changing attitudes of younger artists. Though Stella
retained some of the formal characteristics of Abstract Expressionism
(large format and painterly qualities), he dispensed with the older
generation’s desire to transmit an existential condition to the canvas.
Instead, he wanted simply to “get the paint out of the can and onto the
canvas” with as little inventiveness as possible. Philip Guston, central
to Abstract Expressionism’s development, made a subtle but significant
stylistic shift in Portrait I. At the center of the painting
floats a large dark form that points to his forthcoming adoption of a
cartoonish, figurative style. Al Held, Bruce Conner, Dorothy Dehner and
many others participated in this rich transitional period, ultimately
helping to move art in the United States in numerous directions.

Organized by Marshall N. Price, Ph.D., Nancy A. Nasher and David J. Haemisegger Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art.

Tu, W, F, Sa 10am-5pm, Th 10am-9pm (General admission is free from 5-9pm), Su Noon-5pm.

July 16, 2019

outside door of bulltown, durham

Bulltown Comedy Series

Location: Patio @ Fullsteam Brewery
Time: 9:00 PM to 11:00 PM

Free stand-up comedy. !

Art Exhibit - "Circa 1960"

Location: Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University


The period around 1960 was one of great artistic evolution in
the United States. The long-standing influence exerted by Abstract
Expressionism, a gestural type of painting and sculpture that emerged
after World War II, was dwindling. Artists coming of age at this time
perceived the style as mannered and academic and sought to distance
themselves from its pervasive legacy. This resulted in a gradual shift
in artistic approaches and philosophical attitudes. The works in this
installation demonstrate both the lingering hallmarks of Abstract
Expressionism and the precursors to these new artistic directions.

Frank Stella’s monumental Great Jones Street provides an
example of the changing attitudes of younger artists. Though Stella
retained some of the formal characteristics of Abstract Expressionism
(large format and painterly qualities), he dispensed with the older
generation’s desire to transmit an existential condition to the canvas.
Instead, he wanted simply to “get the paint out of the can and onto the
canvas” with as little inventiveness as possible. Philip Guston, central
to Abstract Expressionism’s development, made a subtle but significant
stylistic shift in Portrait I. At the center of the painting
floats a large dark form that points to his forthcoming adoption of a
cartoonish, figurative style. Al Held, Bruce Conner, Dorothy Dehner and
many others participated in this rich transitional period, ultimately
helping to move art in the United States in numerous directions.

Organized by Marshall N. Price, Ph.D., Nancy A. Nasher and David J. Haemisegger Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art.

Tu, W, F, Sa 10am-5pm, Th 10am-9pm (General admission is free from 5-9pm), Su Noon-5pm.

July 17, 2019

Art Exhibit - "Circa 1960"

Location: Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University


The period around 1960 was one of great artistic evolution in
the United States. The long-standing influence exerted by Abstract
Expressionism, a gestural type of painting and sculpture that emerged
after World War II, was dwindling. Artists coming of age at this time
perceived the style as mannered and academic and sought to distance
themselves from its pervasive legacy. This resulted in a gradual shift
in artistic approaches and philosophical attitudes. The works in this
installation demonstrate both the lingering hallmarks of Abstract
Expressionism and the precursors to these new artistic directions.

Frank Stella’s monumental Great Jones Street provides an
example of the changing attitudes of younger artists. Though Stella
retained some of the formal characteristics of Abstract Expressionism
(large format and painterly qualities), he dispensed with the older
generation’s desire to transmit an existential condition to the canvas.
Instead, he wanted simply to “get the paint out of the can and onto the
canvas” with as little inventiveness as possible. Philip Guston, central
to Abstract Expressionism’s development, made a subtle but significant
stylistic shift in Portrait I. At the center of the painting
floats a large dark form that points to his forthcoming adoption of a
cartoonish, figurative style. Al Held, Bruce Conner, Dorothy Dehner and
many others participated in this rich transitional period, ultimately
helping to move art in the United States in numerous directions.

Organized by Marshall N. Price, Ph.D., Nancy A. Nasher and David J. Haemisegger Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art.

Tu, W, F, Sa 10am-5pm, Th 10am-9pm (General admission is free from 5-9pm), Su Noon-5pm.

July 18, 2019

Art Exhibit - "Circa 1960"

Location: Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University


The period around 1960 was one of great artistic evolution in
the United States. The long-standing influence exerted by Abstract
Expressionism, a gestural type of painting and sculpture that emerged
after World War II, was dwindling. Artists coming of age at this time
perceived the style as mannered and academic and sought to distance
themselves from its pervasive legacy. This resulted in a gradual shift
in artistic approaches and philosophical attitudes. The works in this
installation demonstrate both the lingering hallmarks of Abstract
Expressionism and the precursors to these new artistic directions.

Frank Stella’s monumental Great Jones Street provides an
example of the changing attitudes of younger artists. Though Stella
retained some of the formal characteristics of Abstract Expressionism
(large format and painterly qualities), he dispensed with the older
generation’s desire to transmit an existential condition to the canvas.
Instead, he wanted simply to “get the paint out of the can and onto the
canvas” with as little inventiveness as possible. Philip Guston, central
to Abstract Expressionism’s development, made a subtle but significant
stylistic shift in Portrait I. At the center of the painting
floats a large dark form that points to his forthcoming adoption of a
cartoonish, figurative style. Al Held, Bruce Conner, Dorothy Dehner and
many others participated in this rich transitional period, ultimately
helping to move art in the United States in numerous directions.

Organized by Marshall N. Price, Ph.D., Nancy A. Nasher and David J. Haemisegger Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art.

Tu, W, F, Sa 10am-5pm, Th 10am-9pm (General admission is free from 5-9pm), Su Noon-5pm.

After Work Jazz Social

Location: Rhythms Live Music Hall
Time: 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM

Sit back, relax and enjoy a curated night of live music after work at Rhythms Live. Thye bring together a diverse group of musicians who will ease you through the end of the week into the weekend while sipping and eating comfort food.

Movie Loft presents "Wild Zero"

Location: Shadowbox

Tree Camp

Location: West Point on the Eno
Time: 8:15 AM to 10:45 AM

This is an opportunity for you to be mentored in the identification of many of our one hundred species of native trees and shrubs in the Piedmont region of North Carolina and learn about their medicinal properties from a practicing herbalist as well.

Class size is kept small with only a dozen participants, so you can have the benefit of close personal interaction with Riverdave. Participants must be able to comfortably walk two miles in two hours.

Beer Release: Key Lime Gose

Location: Durty Bull Brewing Company
Time: 4:00 PM to 10:00 PM

The Key Lime Gose returns to draft for Summer 2019. Try this year's batch and see if you pick up on the new ingredient: graham cracker!

Want to take some home with you? Bring your growler, or ask your bartender for one.

Unscripted Turns 2

Location: Unscripted Durham
Time: 5:00 PM to 7:00 PM

Come celebrate our birthday with cake, drinks, and jams by DJ Special K

Insert Your Grandma's Name Here

Location: NorthStar Church of the Arts
Time: 6:00 PM to 6:30 PM

Interactive and evolving installation by Monét Noelle Marshall. In the Ursa Minor Gallery.

From the curator:

This is a celebration of your grandma and, by extension, of you.

A long overdue recognition of grandmothers as culture bearers, as creatives, as artists, as witnesses, as healers, as teachers, as....as.....as.....as love.

This interactive and immersive multimedia experience is an invitation to visit with our own infiniteness.

Cuz we ain't never not been here.

Our grandmas are proof of that.

Nasher Public Highlights Tour

Location: Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University
Time: 6:00 PM to 7:00 PM

Discover amazing art through tours of exhibitions with a knowledgeable Nasher Gallery Guide. Individuals, or groups of fewer than 10 people, may take a guided highlights tour of the Nasher Museum’s current exhibitions. Guided tours are offered most Thursdays at 6pm, Sundays at 2 pm. Tours last approximately one hour. Spanish language tours are available by request.

Thursdays Live on the Patio

Location: The Patio at Unscripted
Time: 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM

Live music poolside every Thursday. This week: Tea Cup Gin. Free and open to the public 21 and over.

July 19, 2019

Art Exhibit - "Circa 1960"

Location: Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University


The period around 1960 was one of great artistic evolution in
the United States. The long-standing influence exerted by Abstract
Expressionism, a gestural type of painting and sculpture that emerged
after World War II, was dwindling. Artists coming of age at this time
perceived the style as mannered and academic and sought to distance
themselves from its pervasive legacy. This resulted in a gradual shift
in artistic approaches and philosophical attitudes. The works in this
installation demonstrate both the lingering hallmarks of Abstract
Expressionism and the precursors to these new artistic directions.

Frank Stella’s monumental Great Jones Street provides an
example of the changing attitudes of younger artists. Though Stella
retained some of the formal characteristics of Abstract Expressionism
(large format and painterly qualities), he dispensed with the older
generation’s desire to transmit an existential condition to the canvas.
Instead, he wanted simply to “get the paint out of the can and onto the
canvas” with as little inventiveness as possible. Philip Guston, central
to Abstract Expressionism’s development, made a subtle but significant
stylistic shift in Portrait I. At the center of the painting
floats a large dark form that points to his forthcoming adoption of a
cartoonish, figurative style. Al Held, Bruce Conner, Dorothy Dehner and
many others participated in this rich transitional period, ultimately
helping to move art in the United States in numerous directions.

Organized by Marshall N. Price, Ph.D., Nancy A. Nasher and David J. Haemisegger Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art.

Tu, W, F, Sa 10am-5pm, Th 10am-9pm (General admission is free from 5-9pm), Su Noon-5pm.

Overstory Band – Brightleaf Summer Concert Series

Location: Brightleaf Square

Please no outside food, drinks or coolers.

Footprints

Location: Page Auditorium

Featuring works by Martha Graham, Merce Cunningham, and Paul Taylor! Footprints delivers an outstanding presentation of three modern dance classics, performed with impeccable technique and infectious energy by ADF students. Martha Graham’s "Dark Meadow Suite" is made up of highlights from a much longer work by Martha Graham, "Dark Meadow," which premiered in 1946. The suite, created in 2016, is designed to feature the exceptional choreography that Graham created for the ensemble of dancers in "Dark Meadow." Both the unison dancing and the partnering have been recognized as some of Graham’s most architectural, ritualistic, and profound creations. They are clearly inspired by Graham’s love of the rituals of the natives of the American Southwest and Mexico, which she observed as a young woman. Merce Cunningham’s "How to Pass, Kick, Fall and Run" has an athletic theme, without any specific references to games. The choreography keeps the dancers constantly in motion, never staying in a given place for very long, with two or three things simultaneously occurring on stage at all times. An esplanade is an outdoor place to walk; Paul Taylor, inspired by the sight of a girl running to catch a bus, created the masterwork "Esplanade" based on pedestrian movement. If contemporaries Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg could use ordinary “found objects” like Coke bottles and American flags in their art, Taylor would use such “found movements” as standing, walking, running, sliding, and falling.